ROSSETO C.; ROSSETO A., 2005

Título: Teoria Institucional e Dependência de Recursos na Adaptação Organizacional: uma visão complementar.

In: RAE-eletrônica, Vol. 4

Tipo documento: Artigo

Autor(es): ROSSETO, Carlos; ROSSETO, Adriana

Ano: 2005

Local: http://www.rae.com.br/eletronica/index.cfm?FuseAction=Artigo&ID=1869&Secao=FOR.TE.INS&Volume=4&Numero=1&Ano=2005

Palavras-Chave: Perspectiva institucional, adaptação estratégica, dependência de recursos, determinismo ambiental, isomorfismo.
Resumo:

O presente trabalho aborda o processo de adaptação estratégica organizacional utilizando para sua análise duas abordagens distintas: a perspectiva Institucional e da Dependência de Recursos. O texto em um primeiro momento apresenta uma revisão bibliográfica sobre as perspectivas e após a discussão de como a utilização de ambas na análise dos processos pode contribuir para seu entendimento. A perspectiva Institucional afirma que as organizações resistem às pressões do ambiente na extensão em que a tradição das empresas, o contexto ambiental, ou ambos, suportam tal resistência. Já a perspectiva da Dependência de Recursos sugere que as organizações adaptam-se às pressões na extensão em que os atores organizacionais corretamente percebem e gerenciam as mudanças necessárias. Portanto, para a compreensão de como os processos organizacionais que resultam na sobrevivência ou não das organizações ocorrem há que se considerar a visão das duas perspectivas.

MEYER; ROWAN, 1977

Título: Institutionalized Organizations: Formal Structure as Myth and Ceremony.

In: The American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 83

Tipo documento: Artigo

Autor(es): MEYER, John; ROWAN, Brian

Ano: 1977

Local: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2778293

Palavras-Chave:
Resumo:

Many formal organizational structures arise as reflections of rationalized institutional rues. The elaboration of such rules in modern states and societies accounts in part for the expansion and increased complexity of formal organizational structures. Institutional rules function as myths which organizations incorporate, gaining legitimacy, resources, stability, and enhanced survival prospects. Organizations whose structures become isomorphic with the myths of the institutional environment – in contrast with those primarily structured by the demands of technical production and exchange – decrease internal coordination and control in order to maintain legitimacy. Structures are decoupled from each other and from ongoing activities. In place of coordination, inspection, and evaluation, a logic of confidence and good faith is employed.

JACOBSON, 2009

Título: Revisiting IT Governance in the Light of Institutional Theory.

In: 42th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. IEEE Computer Society

Tipo documento: Artigo

Autor(es): JACOBSON, Dax

Ano: 2009

Local: http://csdl2.computer.org/comp/proceedings/hicss/2009/3450/00/09-10-02.pdf

Palavras-Chave:
Resumo:

IT governance research has been largely normative and has provided a great deal of useful insight into what effective IT governance should be. What has received less attention is an understanding of what really happens as organizations struggle to achieve effective IT governance. We argue that the time has come to supplement the important research on what IT governance should be with research on how IT governance is actually accomplished. Before moving forward we take a step back. We trace the evolution of IT governance research and the shared theoretical base. We then suggest institutional theory as a promising alternative for answering three questions yet to be fully addressed in the literature:

(1) How is IT governance actually done?;

(2) What are the links between IT governance and performance?; and

(3) How does IT governance change over time?

EISENHARDT, 1989

Título: Agency Theory: An Assessment and Review.

In: Academy of Management Review, Volume 14

Tipo documento: Artigo

Autor(es): EISENHARDT, Kathleen

Ano: 1989

Local: http://www.toorenburg.net/timbv/Adviesgebieden/outsourcing/principal-agent-theorie/Agency%20Theory,%20An%20Assessment%20Eisenhardt,%20AMR%201989.pdf/at_download/file

Palavras-Chave:
Resumo:

Agency theory is an important, yet controversial, theory. This paper reviews agency theory, its contributions to organization theory, and the extant empirical work and develops testable propositions. The conclusions are that agency theory (a) offers unique insight into information systems, outcome uncertainty, incentives, and risk and (b) is an empirically valid perspective, particularly when coupled with complementary perspectives. The principal recommendation is to incorporate an agency perspective in studies of the many problems having a cooperative structure.

EISENHARDT, 1988

Título: Agency – and Institutional – Theory Explanations: The case of retail sales compensation.

In: Academy of Management Journal, Volume 31

Tipo documento: Artigo

Autor(es): EISENHARDT, Kathleen

Ano: 1988

Local: http://www.jstor.org/stable/256457

Palavras-Chave:
Resumo:

This research evaluated when organizations use salary compensation and when they use compensation that is based on performance. Variables from agency – and institutional – theory perspectives were used to explore the sales-compensation policies of 54 retail specialty stores. The programmability of a job, span of control, uncertainty, type of merchandise, and the age of a store chain were strong predictors of compensation policy. Overall, the results suggest that both perspectives are necessary for a good description of compensation policies.

DIMAGGIO; POWELL, 1983

Título: The Iron Cage Revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields.

In: American Sociological Review, Vol. 48.

Tipo documento: Artigo

Autor(es): DIMAGGIO, Paul; POWELL, Walter.

Ano: 1983

Local: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095101

Palavras-Chave:
Resumo:

What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the professions. Once a set of organizations emerges as a field, a paradox arises: rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them. We describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative-leading to this outcome. We then specify hypotheses about the impact of resource centralization and dependency, goal ambiguity and technical uncertainty, and professionalization and structuration on isomorphic change. Finally, we suggest implications for theories of organizations and social change.